LLCC at Central Illinois Building Trades Career Day

LLCC recruitment and WEI staff attended the Central Illinois Building Trades Career Day Wednesday at the Bank of Springfield Center, speaking with high school students about careers in the trades. More than 70 students from Mt. Pulaski, Winchester and Triopia then came to campus and toured our Workforce Careers Center!

Visitors tour the auto tech lab on campus

Special thanks to those who assisted with middle school tours!

LLCC Public Relations and Marketing staff would like to thank everyone who assisted us with the campus tours for more than 370 Glenwood Middle School students, teachers and parents who visited campus on May 1 and 2. During the visits, the students were given the opportunity to learn about several of the career and technical programs at LLCC by participating faculty and staff. Special thanks to Nick Ferreira, Melissa Glossop, Dr. Sonja Harvey, Bill Harmon, Christopher Tople, Julie Rourke, Tom Spears, Tracy Stout, Nancy Sweet, Michael Clark, Christina Courier, Jim Gain, Brian Earley, Holly Bauman and Julie Sutfin.

The students started their visit with a brief welcome, then toured the Workforce Careers Center and health professions labs. They learned about agriculture, automotive technology, aviation, culinary, commercial electrical maintenance, emergency services, emerging technologies, nursing and surgical technology. Students also enjoyed popcorn provided by emerging technologies and special treats from baking and pastry created on an anti-griddle!

Demonstration of ambulance simulatorPreparing treats in baking and pastry labSoil sampler in Ag Mechanics labRobotic arm in emerging technologies labStudents in Auto Technology lab

Register for a raised bed in the LLCC Community Garden

Faculty, staff, students and community members can now register for a raised bed in the LLCC Community Garden. As a garden participant you will manage your own space to grow the fruits or vegetables of your choice all season long. A $20 garden fee allows you to choose one or two raised beds. There are also options for three and four beds available, depending on the amount of space you are willing to manage. Raised beds are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis until filled. First-time gardeners are welcome!

There are many documented benefits of gardening – it is cheaper to grow your own food; you can reduce stress through gardening activities and connecting with the soil; and you can eat a healthier, more delicious diet by incorporating whole foods that you grow yourself.

The LLCC Community Garden is located behind the Workforce Careers Center and Montgomery Hall. We have secured funding this year for new fencing for the garden area. Hopefully this will detour the deer population and other garden pests from produce and flowers.

Contact Darla Cochran at 786-2407 or darla.cochran@llcc.edu for more information about the LLCC Community Garden and to inquire about garden space availability.

HCCTP repairs sidewalk east of Menard Hall

The Highway Construction Careers Training Program (HCCTP) students have finished pouring concrete for a new section of sidewalk east of Menard Hall. The existing sidewalk was cracked and in need of repair. HCCTP teaches the basics of construction through hands-on training. So students laid out a new plan for that section of sidewalk, removed the old concrete with jack hammers and moved the sidewalk over so it lined up with the east door of Menard Hall. Students were assisted by the Cement Masons Local 18.

HCCTP sidewalk repair HCCTP sidewalk repair
HCCTP sidewalk repair HCCTP sidewalk repair

Truck Driver Training program receives special thanks

Thank you so much for allowing CRAIG to visit our Pre-K program to help celebrate Week of the Young Child. He always does a fantastic job explaining what a truck driver does. I love seeing our children’s faces light up when they sit in the seat of the BIG truck.

Thanks again,
Janelle Moffitt,
Ball-Chatham Pre-K Parent Coordinator

Register now for the 2017 Community Garden!

Faculty, staff, and students can now register for a raised bed in the LLCC Community Garden. As a garden participant you will manage your own space to grow the fruits or vegetables of your choice all season long. A $20 garden allows you to choose one or two raised beds, depending on the amount of space you are willing to manage. Raised beds are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis until filled. First-time gardeners are welcome!

There are many documented benefits of gardening – it is cheaper to grow your own food; you can reduce stress through gardening activities and connecting with the soil; and you can eat a healthier, more delicious diet by incorporating whole foods that you grow yourself.

The LLCC Community Garden is located behind the Workforce Careers Center and Montgomery Hall.

Contact Marnie Record at 786-4993 for more information about the LLCC Community Garden and to inquire about garden space availability.

Last chance for LLCC farm stand survey Monday

Monday, Jan. 23: Last chance to take a survey about the LLCC farm stand! The Workforce Development department is looking for your feedback to develop our gardening plan for growing produce that will be available at a campus farm stand beginning late spring. Share your interest in purchasing LLCC grown food and flowers through this 3-5 minute survey:  https://lincolnland.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_237rel9qMlTzSsJ. Your answers will determine what the campus farm stand will have available, where it will be located, and what time and day the farm stand will be held. We greatly appreciate your time in responding to the survey!

What’s the Buzz!?

photoLLCC is now home to two donated honey bee hives! The LLCC Sustainability Committee was approached in the spring about placing bee hives on the campus. Beekeeper Dr. Stu Jacobson worked with committee member Steve Handy and workforce specialist Marnie Record to make sure the bees found a location identified as a good place for the bees as well as a safe place for those on campus. The bees are located on the southeast end of campus along the tree line. Signs will be posted near the hive area to alert people of the location. Most recently, community education students in Bee Series: Fall Management, were able to have a live demonstration at the site. In the future, credit classes will be able to incorporate the bee hives into their academic learning and Community Learning will be able to expand their class offerings. If you would like to read about all the benefits of bees, check out Jessica Tucker’s article on One Green Planet titled: How Bees Benefit Other Living Things. The college will surely benefit from bees in ways described in the article which include:

  • Benefits to our prairies and flower bearing plants – the perfect relationship in nature; bees need flowers and flowers need bees!
  • Agriculture – did you know pollination of agricultural crops are responsible for one out of every three bites of food we eat!
  • Providing food – who doesn’t like honey!
  • Acting as environmental indicators –the decline of bees is an indicator that something is amiss in our environment – perhaps the effects of pesticides!

For more information contact Julie Rourke, chair, Sustainability Committee.

LLCC to offer Agricultural Watershed Management program

LLCC’s Workforce Development department is launching two Agricultural Watershed Management certificate programs this fall for farm owners, farm operators and agricultural service providers, as well as traditional agriculture and environmental science students.

The new courses are being offered at the LLCC-Springfield campus beginning Aug. 22. Additional courses will begin Oct. 18, Jan.10 and March 14.

“Agricultural nutrient loss reduction and sediment retention are very valuable in today’s farming economy, resulting in a higher net income for the producer while increasing land values to the owner,” said David Bowman, workforce coordinator and developer of the Agricultural Watershed certificate program curriculum. “This pioneering new program is a cross between hands-on laboratory practice and online learning for emerging agricultural watershed management technologies, and aligns within stated goals of the Illinois Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy. Our program expects to contribute to the reduction of nutrient and soil sediment losses for Lake Springfield with its watershed, an EPA-designated “priority watershed,” and around the state, while building Illinois’ bioeconomy.” Continue reading