LLCC welcomes new dean of English and humanities

Dr. Joel DykstraJoel Dykstra, Ed.D., from Roswell, New Mexico, has joined Lincoln Land Community College as dean of English and humanities. He began his new duties May 18.

Dr. Dykstra comes to LLCC from the New Mexico Military Institute where he served as associate dean of the humanities division for eight years. He also taught Arabic and Spanish at NMMI for 15 years and was involved in the leadership of the school’s participation in HLC’s Student Persistence and Completion Academy and the development of an early warning system. In 1999, Dykstra enlisted in the U.S. Army as an Arabic linguist. He served with the First Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas, and was deployed twice after 9/11. Prior to that, he worked as an assistant professor of Spanish at Northwestern College in Iowa and Colorado Mesa University.

“Dr. Dykstra’s extensive experience both in the classroom and as an administrator will serve him and our college well,” said Vern Lindquist, Ph.D., vice president of academic services at LLCC. “LLCC is happy to welcome him and his family back home to the Midwest.”

Dykstra is originally from Grand Rapids, Michigan. He earned a doctor of education degree in community college leadership from Texas Tech University. He attended Michigan State University and the University of New Mexico for graduate studies and attended Calvin University and Grand Valley State University for undergraduate studies.

Meditation and writing practice, starting Jan. 25

Faculty, staff and students are invited to join us for meditation and writing practice every other Saturday morning, starting tomorrow, Jan. 25, from approximately 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the library conference room located in the northwest corner of the main floor of our LLCC Library. Whether you want to journal or begin essays, short stories or poetry — the practice of meditation combined with free writing is a great way to begin, continue or invigorate your current writing practice. If interested, please bring a notebook and pen or tablet/laptop and any writing prompts you might want to use with the group.

Three of us met the first morning. We liked the following format, but we are also open to adapting and changing:

  1. Short, unguided meditation time
  2. Free write without a prompt
  3. Sharing what we wrote

As we build our writing practices, we may want to share writing via email, between meetings. Keep in mind this is optional. Some may just want to write when we get together and leave it at that.

We have also talked about mixing up the style and types of meditation. If you aren’t familiar with writing/meditating practice together,  you might want to check out “Writing Down the Bones” by Natalie Goldberg. (A copy is available in the LLCC Library).

We are hoping to share this practice with more of the campus community. Please forward to folks you know — students, staff and faculty included — who you think may be interested, and let either of us know if you have questions, concerns or suggestions. Hope to see you on Jan. 25 at 11 a.m.

– John Paul Jaramillo and Dr. Deborah Brothers, professors of English

Meditation and writing practice, starting Jan. 25

Faculty, staff and students are invited to join us for meditation and writing practice every other Saturday morning, starting Jan. 25, from approximately 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the library conference room located in the northwest corner of the main floor of our LLCC Library. Whether you want to journal or begin essays, short stories or poetry — the practice of meditation combined with free writing is a great way to begin, continue or invigorate your current writing practice. If interested, please bring a notebook and pen or tablet/laptop and any writing prompts you might want to use with the group.
Three of us met the first morning. We liked the following format, but we are also open to adapting and changing:
  1. Short, unguided meditation time
  2. Free write without a prompt
  3. Sharing what we wrote
As we build our writing practices, we may want to share writing via email, between meetings. Keep in mind this is optional. Some may just want to write when we get together and leave it at that.
We have also talked about mixing up the style and types of meditation. If you aren’t familiar with writing/meditating practice together,  you might want to check out “Writing Down the Bones” by Natalie Goldberg. (A copy is available in the LLCC Library).
We are hoping to share this practice with more of the campus community. Please forward to folks you know — students, staff and faculty included — who you think may be interested, and let either of us know if you have questions, concerns or suggestions. Hope to see you on Jan. 25 at 11 a.m.
John Paul Jaramillo and Dr. Deborah Brothers, professors of English

Open forum today with candidate for dean, English and humanities

An open forum will be held today, Nov. 26, from 2-2:45 p.m. in Menard Hall, Room 2209 with the third candidate for the dean of English and humanities position. Please attend if possible.

Open forums with candidates for dean, natural and agricultural science begin Monday, Dec. 2.

  • Monday, Dec. 2, 2-2:45 p.m. in Menard Hall, Room 2207
  • Wednesday, Dec. 4, 1:30-2:15 p.m. in the Trutter Center
  • Monday, Dec. 9, 1:45-2:30 p.m. in Menard Hall, Room 2207

Open forums with candidates for dean

Three candidates will be coming to campus for interviews for the dean of natural and agricultural science position. Below are the dates, locations and times for these forums. Please attend if possible.

  • Monday, Dec. 2, 2-2:45 p.m. in Menard Hall, Room 2207
  • Wednesday, Dec. 4, 1:30-2:15 p.m. in the Trutter Center
  • Monday, Dec. 9, 1:45-2:30 p.m. in Menard Hall, Room 2207

Also, as a reminder, the third and final open forum for the dean of English and humanities position will be held tomorrow, Nov. 26, 2-2:45 p.m. in Menard Hall, Room 2209.