Christmas concert today, 7 p.m.

Performances

November and December performances by faculty and students in LLCC’s music program kick off this week at various locations.

  • Tuesday, Nov. 19 – free Christmas concert by the Capital Area Concert Band and LLCC Band students, 7 p.m., Trutter Center
  • Wednesday, Nov. 20 – “An Evening of Guitar Music,” free concert, 7 p.m., A. Lincoln Commons
  • Choir Concert Lincoln Land Community CollegeFriday, Nov. 22 – “Getting to Know You,” free LLCC Choir fall concert featuring a mix of new choral director Laurie Lewis-Fritz’s favorite repertoire including classical, Motown, musical theatre and more, 7 p.m., A. Lincoln Commons
  • Sunday, Nov. 24 – LLCC Big Band, 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., followed by LLCC Choir, 1-2 p.m., Festival of Trees, Orr Building, Illinois State Fairgrounds
  • Monday, Nov. 25 – free LLCC Big Band fall concert, 7 p.m., A. Lincoln Commons
  • Wednesday, Dec. 4 – “Viva America,” free LLCC Choir performance in conjunction with the UIS Choir, noon, UIS Student Union Ballroom
  • Wednesday, Dec. 4 – free LLCC Honors Recital featuring LLCC music majors in end-of-semester performances, 7 p.m., Menard Hall, Room 2250

Opportunity to join music groups

Faculty, staff and community members can also join the college’s band and choral groups for the spring 2020 semester through LLCC Community Education.

LLCC Choir

Community Education offers a class is for community members that are not otherwise credit-seeking students at the college and wish to join the LLCC Choir. The class will meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 12-12:50 p.m. in Menard 2250 beginning Jan. 13. Students will sing a wide variety of music and have performance opportunities. The class fee is $10. Register by going online via WebAdvisor or calling LLCC Registration at 786-2292, and use course code CEW-102-04.

LLCC Big Band

For those interested in joining the LLCC Big Band, contact manley.mallard@llcc.edu.

LLCC Music concert series begins tomorrow

Performances

November and December performances by faculty and students in LLCC’s music program kick off this week at various locations.

  • Tuesday, Nov. 19 – free Christmas concert by the Capital Area Concert Band and LLCC Band students, 7 p.m., Trutter Center
  • Wednesday, Nov. 20 – “An Evening of Guitar Music,” free concert, 7 p.m., A. Lincoln Commons
  • Choir Concert Lincoln Land Community CollegeFriday, Nov. 22 – “Getting to Know You,” free LLCC Choir fall concert featuring a mix of new choral director Laurie Lewis-Fritz’s favorite repertoire including classical, Motown, musical theatre and more, 7 p.m., A. Lincoln Commons
  • Sunday, Nov. 24 – LLCC Big Band, 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., followed by LLCC Choir, 1-2 p.m., Festival of Trees, Orr Building, Illinois State Fairgrounds
  • Monday, Nov. 25 – free LLCC Big Band fall concert, 7 p.m., A. Lincoln Commons
  • Wednesday, Dec. 4 – “Viva America,” free LLCC Choir performance in conjunction with the UIS Choir, noon, UIS Student Union Ballroom
  • Wednesday, Dec. 4 – free LLCC Honors Recital featuring LLCC music majors in end-of-semester performances, 7 p.m., Menard Hall, Room 2250

Opportunity to join music groups

Faculty, staff and community members can also join the college’s band and choral groups for the spring 2020 semester through LLCC Community Education.

LLCC Choir

Community Education offers a class is for community members that are not otherwise credit-seeking students at the college and wish to join the LLCC Choir. The class will meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 12-12:50 p.m. in Menard 2250 beginning Jan. 13. Students will sing a wide variety of music and have performance opportunities. The class fee is $10. Register by going online via WebAdvisor or calling LLCC Registration at 786-2292, and use course code CEW-102-04.

LLCC Big Band

For those interested in joining the LLCC Big Band, contact manley.mallard@llcc.edu.

“Stamps of Hope” in Murray Gallery through Nov. 14

"My Pathway" by Mohammad AmariThere’s still time to view the art exhibit “Stamps of Hope” through Nov. 14 in the James S. Murray Gallery. It is a traveling art exhibit that showcases Syrian refugee artwork from the Zaa’tari Refugee Camp in Jordan. It can be viewed on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

“The art celebrates the hope of a war-torn people who have left their home to try to create a better life for themselves and their families. This community of artists is struggling to make a living in a country where they have no security or citizenship,” explains Rihab Sawah, LLCC assistant professor of physics and organizer of the “Stamps of Hope” exhibit.

Studio circle of Jasmine - contemporary artSome refugees had brought a few art supplies with them from Syria. They painted on available material such as newspapers and cardboard boxes that were used for transporting food and tent fabric from the camp. Eventually, they held an art exhibit within the refugee camp. The UN Commission and International Relief and Development Organization became interested in the art projects and supported the refugees by bringing in art supplies and arranging for participation in art exhibits outside the refugee camp.

The current “Stamps of Hope” exhibit opened at LLCC and will travel around the country for five years. New paintings and new contributing artists join the exhibit annually. The exhibit is sponsored by the Midwest Institute for International and Intercultural Education (MIIIE) based at Kalamazoo Valley Community College in Michigan.

“Stamps of Hope” gallery talk and reception today

"My Pathway" by Mohammad AmariThe public is invited to attend a gallery talk and reception today, Oct. 24, beginning at 5:30 p.m. in the Trutter Center for the art exhibit “Stamps of Hope.” The talk will be followed by a gallery tour and reception featuring Middle Eastern cuisine.

“Stamps of Hope,” is a traveling art exhibit that showcases Syrian refugee artwork from the Zaa’tari Refugee Camp in Jordan. It is on display in the James S. Murray Gallery through Nov. 14 and can be viewed on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Rihab Sawah, LLCC assistant professor of physics and organizer of the “Stamps of Hope” exhibit, will present the gallery talk. “The art celebrates the hope of a war-torn people who have left their home to try to create a better life for themselves and their families. This community of artists is struggling to make a living in a country where they have no security or citizenship,” she explains.

Artist at work at the campSome refugees had brought a few art supplies with them from Syria. They painted on available material such as newspapers and cardboard boxes that were used for transporting food and tent fabric from the camp. Eventually, they held an art exhibit within the refugee camp. The UN Commission and International Relief and Development Organization became interested in the art projects and supported the refugees by bringing in art supplies and arranging for participation in art exhibits outside the refugee camp.

Stamps of HopeThe current “Stamps of Hope” exhibit is opening at LLCC and will travel around the country for five years. New paintings and new contributing artists join the exhibit annually. The exhibit is sponsored by the Midwest Institute for International and Intercultural Education (MIIIE) based at Kalamazoo Valley Community College in Michigan.

Gallery talk and reception for “Stamps of Hope” tomorrow

"My Pathway" by Mohammad AmariThe public is invited to attend a gallery talk and reception tomorrow, Oct. 24, beginning at 5:30 p.m. in the Trutter Center for the art exhibit “Stamps of Hope.” The talk will be followed by a gallery tour and reception featuring Middle Eastern cuisine.

“Stamps of Hope,” is a traveling art exhibit that showcases Syrian refugee artwork from the Zaa’tari Refugee Camp in Jordan. It is on display in the James S. Murray Gallery through Nov. 14 and can be viewed on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Rihab Sawah, LLCC assistant professor of physics and organizer of the “Stamps of Hope” exhibit, will present the gallery talk. “The art celebrates the hope of a war-torn people who have left their home to try to create a better life for themselves and their families. This community of artists is struggling to make a living in a country where they have no security or citizenship,” she explains.

Studio circle of Jasmine - contemporary artSome refugees had brought a few art supplies with them from Syria. They painted on available material such as newspapers and cardboard boxes that were used for transporting food and tent fabric from the camp. Eventually, they held an art exhibit within the refugee camp. The UN Commission and International Relief and Development Organization became interested in the art projects and supported the refugees by bringing in art supplies and arranging for participation in art exhibits outside the refugee camp.

The artists regularly organize art workshops for children in the refugee camps. Such workshops offer the children a platform to express their ideas and sentiments, as well as give them hope for a brighter future, which they paint with their own hands and hearts. These artists have created a place for children to share their emotions and to come together as a community and learn they are not alone. The children’s workshops are a place for encouraging creativity and healing war wounds, and are funded by the artists themselves from the sale of their artwork.

Stamps of HopeThe current “Stamps of Hope” exhibit is opening at LLCC and will travel around the country for five years. New paintings and new contributing artists join the exhibit annually. The exhibit is sponsored by the Midwest Institute for International and Intercultural Education (MIIIE) based at Kalamazoo Valley Community College in Michigan.

“Stamps of Hope” opens today in Murray Gallery; gallery talk and reception Oct. 24

James S. Murray Gallery. Lincoln Land Community College. Oct. 21-Nov. 14, 2019. Stamps of Hope: Syrian Refugee Art. Traveling exhibition. Lecture by Rihab Sawah: Thursday, Oct. 24, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Trutter Center. Followed by reception: James S. Murray Gallery. Middle Eastern cuisine provided.I would like to invite you to attend LLCC’s Exhibit for Syrian refugee artists, “Stamps of Hope.” The exhibit will be on display in the James S. Murray Gallery from Oct. 21-Nov. 14. The college will hold a gallery talk regarding the Syrian refugee artists, their artwork and a brief background on the Syrian refugee crisis on Oct. 24 at 5:30 p.m. in the Trutter Center. The presentation will be followed by a visit to the art gallery and a reception at which Middle Eastern cuisine will be provided.

The exhibit will be a traveling exhibit; it will launch from LLCC and travel for five years around the country. The traveling exhibit is sponsored by the Midwest Institute for International and Intercultural Education (MIIIE) consortium of which LLCC is a member.

“Stamps of Hope”
Syrian Refugee Travel Art Exhibit
Oct. 21-Nov. 14
James S. Murray Gallery
Mon-Fri, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Presentation by Assistant Professor of Physics Rihab Sawah
Oct. 24, 2019, 5:30-7 p.m.
LLCC Trutter Center
Followed by a reception at the James S. Murray Gallery
Menard Hall, Second Floor
Middle Eastern cuisine provided

Visit the exhibit’s Facebook page to view some of the artwork that will be on display, in addition to other information.

I look forward to personally greeting you at this cultural, educational event.

Sincerely,
Rihab Sawah

“Stamps of Hope” opens in Murray Gallery Oct. 21; reception Oct. 24

Stamps of HopeLLCC will host the traveling art exhibit “Stamps of Hope,” showcasing Syrian refugee artwork from the Zaa’tari Refugee Camp in Jordan, from Oct. 21-Nov. 14. The exhibit can be viewed in the James S. Murray Gallery, located in Menard Hall, on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The public is invited to attend a gallery talk on Thursday, Oct. 24, 5:30-7 p.m. in the Trutter Center on the LLCC Springfield campus, 5250 Shepherd Road. The talk will be followed by a gallery tour and reception featuring Middle Eastern cuisine.

Rihab Sawah, LLCC assistant professor of physics and organizer of the Stamps of Hope exhibit, will present the gallery talk. “The art celebrates the hope of a war-torn people who have left their home to try to create a better life for themselves and their families. This community of artists is struggling to make a living in a country where they have no security or citizenship,” she explains.

Artist at work at the campSome refugees had brought a few art supplies with them from Syria. They painted on available material such as newspapers and cardboard boxes that were used for transporting food and tent fabric from the camp. Eventually, they held an art exhibit within the refugee camp. The UN Commission and International Relief and Development Organization became interested in the art projects and supported the refugees by bringing in art supplies and arranging for participation in art exhibits outside the refugee camp.

Studio circle of Jasmine - contemporary artThe artists regularly organize art workshops for children in the refugee camps. Such workshops offer the children a platform to express their ideas and sentiments, as well as give them hope for a brighter future, which they paint with their own hands and hearts. These artists have created a place for children to share their emotions and to come together as a community and learn they are not alone. The children’s workshops are a place for encouraging creativity and healing war wounds, and are funded by the artists themselves from the sale of their artwork.

The current “Stamps of Hope” exhibit is opening at LLCC and will travel around the country for five years. New paintings and new contributing artists join the exhibit annually. The exhibit is sponsored by the Midwest Institute for International and Intercultural Education (MIIIE) based at Kalamazoo Valley Community College in Michigan.

“the Power of 3” on exhibit through Oct. 10

There is still time to view the exhibit “the Power of 3” in LLCC’s James S. Murray Gallery, which is on display through Oct. 10! It showcases artwork from Sharon Carter; Diane Wilson, marketing manager, LLCC Foundation; and Wilma Wofford. The public is invited to view the exhibit weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

“Omne trium perfectum” is a Latin phrase which means everything that comes in threes is perfect, or every set of three is complete. Carter, Wilson and Wofford chose to show their work together because of both the commonalities and differences that make the presentation complete and perfect. They relate in commonality as three women, who are three artists. The differences come in the form of three unique styles. The artists hope the combined works will boost the memory of the audience and help viewers appreciate and remember the power of fine art.

"Whale" by Sharon Carter"Ryan's Hands" by Diane WilsonOwl ceramic by Wilma Wofford

“the Power of 3” reception today at 5:30 p.m.

The public is invited to a reception for “the Power of 3” today at 5:30 p.m. in LLCC’s James S. Murray Gallery. The exhibit showcases artwork from Sharon Carter; Diane Wilson, marketing manager, LLCC Foundation; and Wilma Wofford. The exhibit can be viewed weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 10.

“Omne trium perfectum” is a Latin phrase which means everything that comes in threes is perfect, or every set of three is complete. Carter, Wilson and Wofford chose to show their work together because of both the commonalities and differences that make the presentation complete and perfect. They relate in commonality as three women, who are three artists. The differences come in the form of three unique styles. The artists hope the combined works will boost the memory of the audience and help viewers appreciate and remember the power of fine art.

"Whale" by Sharon Carter"Ryan's Hands" by Diane WilsonOwl ceramic by Wilma Wofford