LLCC co-hosted Bread Camp for professionals

breadLLCC co-hosted the Springfield location of Spence Farm Foundation’s 2018 Bread Camp on Sunday, July 8. The event was planned and organized by Nancy Sweet, director of culinary programs and operations and Jolene Adams, coordinator, LLCC Culinary Institute. Sean Keeley, culinary specialist, cooked lunch for guests on Sunday at LLCC with produce from local community gardens. The event also included a farm tour in Pana and talks from industry experts and baking bread at Danenberger Family Vineyards.

Bread Camp class

Led by 2017 and 2018 James Beard Award Outstanding Baker nominee Greg Wade from Publican Quality Bread, students had an intensive two-day camp on baking, focusing on utilizing organic whole grains, the role of fermentation in baking, and bio-dynamic farm systems and their incredibly important role in the entire bread and grain supply chain.

Industry professional students learned from and networked with a variety of industry experts such as

  • Erika Chan – executive pastry chef at the Publican, Chicago
  • Jill Brockman-Cummings – miller, The Mill at Janie’s Farm, Ashkum
  • Keith Seiz  – The National Honey Board
  • Liz Moran Stelk – executive director, Illinois Stewardship Alliance, Springfield
  • Fred and Carolyn Gerberding – local beekeepers
  • Jack Erisman – Erisman Farm, certified organic farm, Pana
  • Woody Woodruff – conservation expert, including soil and crop rotation, Illinois Stewardship Alliance, Springfield

Touring farmBeekeepingMillingBaking bread

Building Illinois: Entrepreneurialism Flourishes, Workers Rise  

Join LLCC’s Academy of Lifelong Learning this Sunday, July 15, at 2 p.m. in the Thorne Deuel Auditorium at the Illinois State Museum, 502 S. Spring St. for “Building Illinois: Entrepreneurialism Flourishes, Workers Rise.” Beginning with 1850s railroad construction, Illinois boomed as an agricultural and industrial powerhouse. Familiar brand names, from Wrigley chewing gum to Swift and Armour meat products, covered the nation. Looking at two specific industries, Mike Matejka will cover not only the business expansion, but the workplace tensions that followed.

Mike Matejka is the governmental affairs director for the Great Plains Laborers District Council, representing over 10,000 union laborers in central and northern Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota. He is a vice-president of the Illinois Labor History Society and a past-president and board member of the McLean County Museum of History. He served 18 years on the Bloomington City Council and is involved in numerous civic and community groups. In 1984 he co-authored, with Greg Koos, “Bloomington’s C&A Shops: Our Lives Remembered,” an oral history collection with railroad shop workers, and in 2000, “Fiery Struggle: Illinois Fire Fighters Build a Union, 1901-1985.”

The program is free and open to the public. Reservations are not required.

College For Kids in July

The traditional sessions of College for Kids start today, July 9! It is the first of three unique week-long enrichment programs occurring July 9-12, July 16-19 and July 23-26 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Students who have completed grades K-8 will be on campus taking courses such as LEGO Explorers, Space Is the Place, American Sign Language, Backyard Ballistics, Full STEAM Ahead and Powerful Potions!

Community education proposals due July 1

LLCC Community Education is seeking highly motivated faculty, staff and community members who are interested in teaching topics of personal interest, current trends and/or subject expertise.

Please submit your spring 2019 course proposals by July 1, 2018 at http://www.llcc.edu/teaching-proposal.

If you are interested in sharing your time and talents as a community education instructor, please consider the following applicant criteria:

  • Possess knowledge and skill in proposed subject area.
  • Have passion and desire to share proposed topic with others.
  • Hold a bachelor’s degree and/or have teaching experience.

For additional information, email Laurel.Bretz@llcc.edu or call 786-2430.

Submit community education teaching proposals

LLCC Community Education is seeking highly motivated faculty, staff and community members who are interested in teaching topics of personal interest, current trends and/or subject expertise.

Please submit your spring 2019 course proposals by July 1, 2018 at http://www.llcc.edu/teaching-proposal.

If you are interested in sharing your time and talents as a community education instructor, please consider the following applicant criteria:

  • Possess knowledge and skill in proposed subject area.
  • Have passion and desire to share proposed topic with others.
  • Hold a bachelor’s degree and/or have teaching experience.

For additional information, email Laurel.Bretz@llcc.edu or call 786-2430.

Bicentennial series: Illinois Antislavery and the Struggle for Freedom

Join the LLCC Academy of Lifelong Learning this Sunday, June 17, at 2 p.m. in the Thorne Deuel Auditorium at the Illinois State Museum, 502 S. Spring St. for “Illinois Antislavery and the Struggle for Freedom.” The program is free and open to the public. Reservations are not required.

Illinoisans played prominent roles in antislavery movements preceding the Civil War. Understanding the wide range of motivations that might lie behind any given individual’s opposition to slavery — commitment to human rights, belief in racial equality, economic considerations and religious convictions — is important to understanding the escalation to war. Our speaker, Jeanne Schulz Angel, explores the role that the Underground Railroad played in the lives of freedom seekers and includes information about several significant slavery and antislavery sites in Illinois, including sundown towns. Her presentation will demonstrate the complexity of responses to the idea of slavery in the early days of statehood and link it to the impact of human trafficking in present-day Illinois.

Jeanne Schultz Angel’s work on the antislavery movement has continued since she wrote an award-winning graduate thesis on the topic in 2005. She previously served as the executive director of the Lombard Historical Society, where she managed the Sheldon Peck Homestead, listed on the National Park Service Underground Railroad Network to Freedom. Angel has extensive experience in museum management, including work as executive director of the Illinois Association of Museums. She is currently executive director of the Nineteenth Century Club and Charitable Association in Oak Park, Illinois.

Bicentennial series: Illinois Antislavery and the Struggle for Freedom

Join the LLCC Academy of Lifelong Learning this Sunday, June 17, at 2 p.m. in the Thorne Deuel Auditorium at the Illinois State Museum, 502 S. Spring St. for “Illinois Antislavery and the Struggle for Freedom.” The program is free and open to the public. Reservations are not required.

Illinoisans played prominent roles in antislavery movements preceding the Civil War. Understanding the wide range of motivations that might lie behind any given individual’s opposition to slavery — commitment to human rights, belief in racial equality, economic considerations and religious convictions — is important to understanding the escalation to war. Our speaker, Jeanne Schulz Angel, explores the role that the Underground Railroad played in the lives of freedom seekers and includes information about several significant slavery and antislavery sites in Illinois, including sundown towns. Her presentation will demonstrate the complexity of responses to the idea of slavery in the early days of statehood and link it to the impact of human trafficking in present-day Illinois.

Jeanne Schultz Angel’s work on the antislavery movement has continued since she wrote an award-winning graduate thesis on the topic in 2005. She previously served as the executive director of the Lombard Historical Society, where she managed the Sheldon Peck Homestead, listed on the National Park Service Underground Railroad Network to Freedom. Angel has extensive experience in museum management, including work as executive director of the Illinois Association of Museums. She is currently executive director of the Nineteenth Century Club and Charitable Association in Oak Park, Illinois.

Submit community education teaching proposals

LLCC Community Education is seeking highly motivated faculty, staff and community members who are interested in teaching topics of personal interest, current trends and/or subject expertise.

Please submit your spring 2019 course proposals by July 1, 2018 at http://www.llcc.edu/teaching-proposal.

If you are interested in sharing your time and talents as a community education instructor, please consider the following applicant criteria:

  • Possess knowledge and skill in proposed subject area.
  • Have passion and desire to share proposed topic with others.
  • Hold a bachelor’s degree and/or have teaching experience.

For additional information, email Laurel.Bretz@llcc.edu or call 786-2430.

Summer Midday Yoga begins June 6

You can use your lunch hour as a time to unwind and reset your mind. Yoga is proven to benefit mental and physical health. Midday Yoga is a course designed to accommodate the needs of beginning yoga students as well as experienced practitioners. Participants will practice physical postures that stretch and open the body. All levels of experience are welcome. Wear comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat. There is a course limit of 20 participants, so sign up as soon as possible!

Course: Midday Yoga
Instructor: Lissa Overbey
Dates: Wednesdays, June 6–July 18, 2018, no class July 4
Times: 1-2 p.m.
Location: Montgomery 1143/44
Fee: $65
Course Code: CEW 802-06